Department of Education is one of the seven main departments of the executive organ of the Central Tibetan Administration (CTA) based in Dharamsala, India. It was established in 1960 to look after the educational affairs of the Tibetan administration and community in exile. After coming into exile in 1959, His Holiness the XIV Dalai Lama had given top priority to education and requested the then Indian Prime Minister Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru for establishing separate schools for Tibetan refugee children.

The heart purpose of establishing separate schools for Tibetans in India was for provision of quality modern education and preservation of the Tibetan language and culture at the same time. This idea is commonly referred to as the twin-object of the Tibetan schools in exile and became the heart and soul of the Tibetan education policy. The overall level of success towards that object over the past 51 years has remained remarkably high. The Department of Education currently oversees 73 Tibetan schools – excluding the pre-primary sections and private schools – in India and Nepal under different autonomous administrative bodies. There are around 24,000 students and 2,200 staff members in these schools. The autonomous school administrative bodies include: Central Tibetan Schools Administration (28 schools), Tibetan Children’s Villages (18 schools), Tibetan Homes Foundation (3 schools), Sambhota Tibetan Schools Society (12 schools), and Snow Lion Foundation (12 schools). More information is available at: www.sherig.org

About
Introduction

Department of Education is one of the seven main departments of the executive organ of the Central Tibetan Administration (CTA) based in Dharamsala, India. It was established in 1960 to look after the educational affairs of the Tibetan administration and community in exile. After coming into exile in 1959, His Holiness the XIV Dalai Lama had given top priority to education and requested the then Indian Prime Minister Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru for establishing separate schools for Tibetan refugee children.

The heart purpose of establishing separate schools for Tibetans in India was for provision of quality modern education and preservation of the Tibetan language and culture at the same time. This idea is commonly referred to as the twin-object of the Tibetan schools in exile and became the heart and soul of the Tibetan education policy. The overall level of success towards that object over the past 51 years has remained remarkably high.

The Department of Education currently oversees 73 Tibetan schools – excluding the pre-primary sections and private schools – in India and Nepal under different autonomous administrative bodies. There are around 24,000 students and 2,200 staff members in these schools. The autonomous school administrative bodies include: Central Tibetan Schools Administration (28 schools), Tibetan Children’s Villages (18 schools), Tibetan Homes Foundation (3 schools), Sambhota Tibetan Schools Society (12 schools), and Snow Lion Foundation (12 schools).

Despite miraculous past achievements, a general sense of dissatisfaction and a growing number of new challenges – some of which were of serious nature – began to surface during the last two decades. As a long-term measure against those challenges, the CTA framed a ‘Basic Education Policy’ in 2004 for implementation by the Department of Education and different school bodies.

To this end and for various other purposes related to education and welfare of Tibetan refugee children, the Department of Education performs the following functions:

  • to initiate and monitor necessary changes in teaching methodology in schools,
  • to run teacher education and in-service teacher training programs,
  • to provide policy and administrative direction and guidance to schools,
  • to develop and review school curricula, textbooks and other materials,
  • to provide guidance and counseling to students, teachers and parents,
  • to raise and provide scholarships for school and university education,
  • to co-ordinate sponsorship program for orphans and other needy children,
  • to develop, translate and publish children’s books and periodicals,
  • to provide grants to schools and autonomous school bodies,
  • to convene conferences and seminars on education,
  • to recruit students for overseas study programs,
  • to co-ordinate teacher and student exchange programs,
  • to review and evaluate the standard of learning in schools,
  • and to award prizes and certificates to meritorious students and teachers.
Administration

Through education, we strive to meet the challenges of the modern world while preserving our language, culture and traditions. The youth today will be tomorrow’s leaders, building our future and contributing to our development as a nation.

Since the illegal Chinese occupation of Tibet in 1959, His Holiness The Dalai Lama and over 130,000 Tibetans have fled in search of political, religious, educational and other basic freedoms. Upon coming into exile, one of His Holiness the Dalai Lama’s highest priorities was and continues to be providing care and education for Tibetan children, many of whom are orphaned or destitute. He believes that Tibetan youth are the main source of hope for a future free Tibet.

It is this understanding which has guided the Department of Education (DOE) since its inception in 1960. One of the seven major departments of the Central Tibetan Administration, (Tibetan Government in exile) Dharamsala, India, the DOE is the apex body responsible for providing support for the educational and welfare needs of over 25,463 students in 80 Tibetan schools (excluding pre-primary schools) in India, Nepal and Bhutan. Comprised of both residential and day schools, they range from the pre-primary to the senior secondary level. In keeping with the needs of the time and an eye on a future free Tibet we set upon ourselves under the guidance of His Holiness the Dalai Lama, certain objectives and defined the organizational functions that could help us meet those objectives.

Objectives:

  • To oversee the educational needs and welfare of the Tibetan children in exile;
  • To provide primary education for every Tibetan refugee child in order to achieve 100% literacy among the Tibetan refugee community;
  • To inculcate values of personal integrity and universal responsibility;
  • To develop modern scientific and technical education and skills, while preserving and promoting Tibetan language and culture;
  • To address human resource requirements of the Tibetan community in exile and a future free Tibet.
Organizational Functions

To provide our young people with adequate care, appropriate educational foundation and opportunity for higher study, the DOE continually assesses the educational and human resource requirements of our communities in exile. According to these needs, the DOE performs a wide variety of functions. Such functions include but are not limited to the following:

  • Providing administrative guidance in overseeing schools;
  • Coordinating Sponsorship and Scholarship programs;
  • Coordinating Scholarship programs;
  • Creating new schools, teacher training centers and institutions while improving existing ones;
  • Recruiting teachers and arranging in-service training for them;
  • Running an employment and placement bureau;
  • Continual research, planning and development;
  • Reviewing and supplying text books and other required resource materials;
  • Providing necessary buildings and constructions;
  • Raising and appropriating funds.
FAQs

1.   What are the Department of Education’s primary objectives?2.   When was the Department of Education set up?3.   What does tcewf stand for?4.   Is the Department of Education a registered organization?5.   What are the DoE’s organizational functions?6.   What are the DoE’s activities?7.   How does the DoE’s sponsorship program work?8.   How can one help a child or a group of child?9.   Can I directly contact my sponsored child?10. How can I send contributions; in cash or kind to the Department?11. How does the DoE’s scholarship program work?12. What publications do the DoE have?13. What are the primary objectives of the DoE’s publications?14. How can I receive or subscribe to the DoE’s publications?15. What is the literacy rate of Tibetans in exile?16. Does the Tibetan schools have its own syllabus for children?17. How is Tibetan culture and identity transmitted to the children in   the Tibetan schools?18. How can I contribute towards Tibetan education in the Tibetan 19. community in exile?19. How can I find a particular Tibetan school in India, Nepal or Bhutan?20. How many Tibetan schools are there in exile?21. Can I teach in a Tibetan school as a Volunteer while bearing all expenses?22. How can I contact the DoE?23. How can I contact the developers of this site?24. If I wish to offer free server hosting facility as a gift for this site, who should I contact?25. If I wish to provide my web designing expertise for free, who should I contact?

What are the Department of Education’s primary objectives?

  •     To oversee the educational needs and welfare of the Tibetan children in exile.
  •     To provide primary education for every Tibetan refugee child in order to achieve 100% literacy among the Tibetan refugee community.
  •     To inculcate values of personal integrity and universal responsibility.
  •     To develop modern scientific and technical education and skills, while preserving and promoting Tibetan language and culture.
  •     To address human resource requirements of the Tibetan community in exile and a future free Tibet.

When was the Department of Education set up?The Department of Education was incepted in the year 1960.

What does tcewf stand for?TCEWF stand for Tibetan Children’s Educational and Welfare Fund, which is the registered society of the Department of Education.

Is the Department of Education a registered organization?
Yes, as the Tibetan Children’s Educational and Welfare Fund (tcewf) and under the following:

  •     The societies registration act of 1860.
  •     The Foreign Contribution (Regulation) Act.
  •     The certificate of Importer-Exporter.

Our bankers are:

  •     United Commercial Bank (UCO)
  •     State Bank of India (SBI)

What are the DoE’s organizational functions?To provide our young people with adequate care, appropriate educational foundation and opportunity for higher study, the DOE continually assesses the educational and human resource requirements of our communities in exile. According to these needs, the DOE performs a wide variety of functions. Such functions include but are not limited to the following:

  •     Providing administrative guidance in overseeing schools.
  •     Coordinating Sponsorship and Scholarship programs for higher studies.
  •     Creating new schools, teacher training centers and institutions while improving existing ones.
  •     Recruiting teachers and arranging in-service training for them.
  •     Running an employment and placement bureau.
  •     Continual research, planning and development.
  •     Reviewing and supplying text books and other required resource materials.
  •     Providing necessary buildings and constructions.
  •     Raising and appropriating funds.

What are the DoE’s activities?Sponsorship Program:
The Department of Education firmly believes that every Tibetan child living in exile should be given the opportunity to receive a school education. Although each family is encouraged to pay required school fees, due to various hardships, many of them are unable to afford their child’s education. Our community contributes where it can and the Government of India provides generous assistance through subsidies, but without additional support, some families are unable to secure an education for their children. Therefore, the DOE facilitates finding sponsors for them.

Scholarship Program:
Of the youth that graduate from our schools every year, approximately one-third are provided with scholarships for higher education and vocational courses. Our aspiration is to help provide all students with the chance to pursue advance study, while helping them to gain the necessary human resource skills required by exiled communities and in Tibet when we return.

Educational Research, Planning & Development: Tibetan exile education is a continual process of developing new ways and systems to express and promote our social, cultural and national identity while meeting the challenges of the time. While great strides have been made in providing a school education for every Tibetan refugee child, we aspire to expand existing programs and create new ones in areas of need such as, career planning, adult education, vocational training, and job placement. To continually assess school and community needs, the DOE conducts relevant research as the basis of its planning, curriculum and human resource development. The following are DOE projects whose aims are to broaden and enhance the scope, effectiveness and relevancy of Tibetan education.1.    Tibetan National Education Policy Development,2.    Human Resource Development,3.    Teacher Training Development,4.    Educational Infrastructure,5.    Buildings & Construction & Resource Development.

How does the DoE’s sponsorship program work?Sponsorship Program: The Department of Education firmly believes that every Tibetan child living in exile should be given the opportunity to receive a school education. Although each family is encouraged to pay required school fees, due to various hardships, many of them are unable to afford their child’s education. Our community contributes where it can and the Government of India provides generous assistance through subsidies, but without additional support, some families are unable to secure an education for their children. Therefore, the DOE facilitates finding sponsors for them.
In 1975, the Sponsorship Program was established to enable sympathetic individuals and agencies to assist our school-aged children to attain an education. With this support, the Tibetan education movement has continued to progress with each passing year, for which we are deeply grateful.

Selection: In settlements throughout India, Nepal and Bhutan, the most needy children are selected on the recommendation of the local Tibetan Settlement Office, who is in daily contact with the local community and is responsible for their general welfare. Recommendations, background details and photos of the child are screened for authenticity and are then sent to prospective sponsors.

Provisions Sponsorship enables poor children to attend a residential school, or a day school while awaiting a vacancy in a residential school. Not only does sponsorship funds pay school fees, it also provides the child with adequate food, clothing, school uniform, necessary books and stationery.

How can one help a child or a group of child?The sponsorship selections of children are normally done on the basis of recommendations put forth by the Settlement Officers and Regional Tibetan Freedom Movement Offices. Cases, which are genuine, will remain in the waiting list until the sponsor for a child is found. Your wish to sponsor a child will thus be drawn from this waiting list although you will be initially send a case history of children on this list.

Can I directly contact my sponsored child?Not under our present guidelines. This is primarily to avoid unwanted administrative problems for us and pressure on our sponsors. Do contact us at education@tibet.net for more details. Please check us out at our sponsorships page for more details.

How can I send contributions; in cash or kind to the Department?Yes, we welcome all contributions whether in cash or kind. We will send an official receipt as promptly as we can and send an implementation report if you so desire.Our Bankers are:

  •     United Commercial Bank, Dharamsala, India
  •     State Bank of India, Dharamsala, India

Also, please check us out at sponsorships page.

How does the DoE’s scholarship program work?All scholarships offered through DoE are granted after the consideration, verification and collective decisions of two different committees. First, the DoE Scholarship Committee, chaired by the Education Secretary and comprised of seven other responsible staff members of DoE, handles scholarship awards for studies within India. Second, the High Level Scholarship Committee(HLSC), chaired by the Senior Kalon (representative of the Cabinet) and comprised of the Education Minister, the Education Secretary and five other Department secretaries, deals with scholarship awards for studies abroad. The previous community service and excellent academic background of an applicant are frequently the standards for consideration of both the Committees.

What publications do the DoE have?Please click here for more detail.

What are the primary objectives of the DoE’s publications?The DoE publications are primarily meant to provide informative illustrative textbooks, storybooks, resource books, dictionaries, magazines etc to meet the ever-increasing high demand for quality publications for Tibetan schools.

How can I receive or subscribe to the DoE’s publications?Contact us at: Secretary,Department of Education,Central Tibetan Administration,Gangchen Kyishong,Dharamsala – 176215
Himachal Pradesh,
INDIA

Tel: 91-01892-22721/22572
Fax: 91-01892-23481
Email: education@tibet.net

What is the literacy rate of Tibetans in exile?About 82.4 % as per the 2009 Demographic Survey of Tibetans in Exile undertaken by Planning Commission of Central Tibetan Administraiton.

Does the Tibetan schools have its own syllabus for children?The Tibetan schools have their entire Tibetan language Textbook for all grades developed and printed by the Department. For up to class V all non-language textbooks are developed and printed by the Department and its affiliate bodies. For Grades VI onwards the syllabus prescribed by the NCERT for all Indian schools is followed in Tibetan schools based in India while the host nations syllabus is followed in Nepal and Bhutan.

How is Tibetan culture and identity transmitted in the Tibetan schools?The transmission of our rich culture to the younger generation is one of the most important aims of schooling in exile. As such, by far the most important co-curricular activity is the Tibetan cultural activities. Most of the schools have one or more Tibetan dance and drama teachers. All the residential schools have cultural instructors. Inter House and Inter school competitions in Tibetan cultural activities are often the highlight of many school calendars. Some of the activities encouraged in the Tibetan schools:

  •     Special talks on religion and other festivals of Tibet.
  •     Performance of folk items on important occasions.
  •     Debates and quizzes on various aspect of Tibet and Tibetan culture.
  •     Cultural exhibitions.
  •     Cultural exchange programs between different schools.
  •     Tibetan dance and drama competitions.
  •     Tibet: our Country Project.
  •     Observance of all traditional Tibetan festivals.

Over and the above, the Department has introduced Tibetan as a medium of instruction in all the primary schools along with Tibetan textbooks in all these grades.

How can I contribute towards Tibetan education in the Tibetan community in exile?

  •     Through contributions to our various funds.
  •     Through contribution in kind which could include new or used clothing, computer items, toys and books (preferably new). Please send us a mail for more information before you decide to send us anything primarily for queries on customs clearance and postage and handling expenses.
  •     Through voluntary service of extended periods (minimum one year) on numerous projects under various fields though preferably in technical areas like computers and publishing work (especially at the Department).

We also require voluntary trained teachers for our schools but for a minimum period of one academic year. Please refer to point # 23 also.

How can I find a particular Tibetan school in India, Nepal or Bhutan?Please check us out at The schools section for more details.

How many Tibetan schools are there in exile?80 Tibetan schools in India, Nepal and Bhutan. Please check us out at The schools section for more details.

Can I teach in a Tibetan school as a Volunteer while bearing all expenses?Normally not for short duration’s due to administrative difficulties. However, we consider volunteer applicants for teaching English, Science, Math’s, Computers etc. provided they fulfill to the following conditions:

  •     Will agree to volunteer for a minimum period of one whole academic year viz., 1st July to 30th June. (they will get two months break viz.; January and February for schools in higher regions and May and June for schools in lower regions.)
  •     Will bear their own boarding and lodging expenses though some of the residential schools could provide these for free.

How can I contact the Department?You can call us or e-mail us: Tel: 91-01892-22721/22572 
Fax: 91-01892-23481
Email: education@tibet.net

How can I contact the developers of this site?Check us out at the contact page for more details.

If I wish to offer free server hosting facility as a gift for this site, who should I contact?Please contact the webmaster with your free hosting facility offer.

If I wish to provide my web designing expertise for free, who should I contact?Please contact the webmaster with your free web designing expertise offer.

Who's Who

Kalons:

  • Mr. Woser Gyelsten Kundeling (March 4, 1960 – September 1964
  • Mr. Tsering Gonpo Jangtsang (September 1964 – July 10, 1966)
  • Mr. Jigme Sumtsen Wangpo Taring (January 1968 – May 1973)
  • Mr. Thupten Ningee (December 1973 – February 2, 1980)
  • Mr. Juchen Thupten Namgyal (August 24, 1980 – January 1985) and (September 1987 – November 1988)
  • Mr. Tenzin Geyche Tethong (November 1985- September 1990)
  • Mr. Tashi Wangdi (November 1988- May 1990)
  • Mrs. Jetsun Pema (May 17, 1990 – July 1993)
  • Mrs. Rinchen Khando Choegyal (July 1993 – September 2001)
  • Mr. Thupten Lungrig (September 5, 2001 – August 14, 2006) and (October 5, 2006 – May 29, 2011)
  • Kalon Tripa Dr. Lobsang Sangay (September 19, 2011 – September 16, 2014)
  • Mr. Ngodup Tsering (September 17, 2014 – present)

Secretaries:

  • Mr. Lobsang T. Rikha (1976 – 1982)
  • Mr. Rapten Chazotsang (1982 – 1991)
  • Mrs. Yangkyi Samkhar (1991 – 1993)
  • Mr. Tsering Wangyal (1993 – 1995) and (1999 – 2000)
  • Mr. Ngodup Tsering (1991 – 1999)
  • Mr. Tsering Dhundup (March 20, 2000 – April 9, 2002)
  • Ven. Karma Gelek Yuthog (April 10, 2002 – February 2012)
  • Mr. Ngodup Tsering (April 2, 2012 – September 15, 2014)
  • Mr. Topgyal Tsering ( 2013 – present )
  • Mr. Ngawang Rabgyal ( 2014 – present)
Contact Us

Mail:

Secretary
Department of Education
Central Tibetan Administration
Dharamshala – 176215, H.P., India

Tel: +91-1892-222572, 222721
Fax: +91-1892-223481
E-mail: education@tibet.net
Website: www.sherig.org

Programs
Projects

Information updated on: 03/07/10
The Department of Education/Tibetan Children’s Educational and Welfare Fund (TCEWF) has developed five years Educational Development Plan which also forms an integral part of the CTA’s five year INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN-IV (2009–2014). The activities and projects included in the plan are mostly generated through the beneficiaries. Therefore, the projects included in the plan are not just wish list, but actually needed and would be implemented as soon as we receive funding support.

IDP–IV Projects

School Infrastructure Development Projects

Project No.

Project Title

Fund Requested

Rupees

Dollars

IDP–IV (5a) Construction of Additional Staff Quarter, CST Chauntra Rs.8,076,800.00 US$201920.00
IDP-IV (5b) Construction of Additional Staff Quarter, STS Puruwala Rs.4,111,534.50 US$102788.00
IDP–IV (5c) Construction of Additional Staff Quarter, STS Dekyiling Rs.3,183,910.00 US$79598.00
IDP–IV (6) Construction of Boundary Wall/Fencing, STS Pokhriabong Rs.1,102,790.00 US$27570.00
IDP–IV (8) Construction of Additional Hostel, CST Paonta Rs.6,353,000.00 US$158825.00
IDP–IV (11) Construction of Multipurpose Hall, Science Lab and Library, STS Bhuntar Rs.5,356,565.00 US$119,035.00
IDP–IV (19a) Construction of Staff Quarter, Sherab Gatsel Lobling School (Transit School) Rs.5,553,966.00 US$138850.00
IDP–IV (19b) Construction of Mini Hospital/Dispensary, Sherab Gatsel Lobling School (Transit School) Rs.6,604,370.00 US$165109.00
IDP–IV (21) Construction of South Zone Career Counselor Staff Quarter, Mundgodproject Rs. 890,000.00 US$19350.00

 

School Solar Water Heating System And Kitchen Upgradation Projects

Project No.

Project Title

Fund Requested

Rupees

Dollars

IDP–IV (13a) Purchase of Solar Water Heating System, TSTS Gangtok Rs. 287,566.00 US$7190.00
IDP–IV (13e) Purchase of Solar Water Heating System, CST Shillong Rs. 287,566.00 US$7190.00
IDP–IV (15) School Vehicle and Garage, CST Chauntra Rs.637,922.00 US$15948.00
IDP–IV (16a) Kitchen Upgradation, CST Paonta Rs.417,931.00 US$10449.00
IDP–IV (16b) Kitchen Upgradation, STS Bhuntar Rs.417,931.00 US$10449.00
IDP–IV (16c) Kitchen Upgradation, Petoen School Rs.417,931.00 US$10449.00
IDP–IV (16d) Kitchen Upgradation, TSTS Gangtok Rs.417,931.00 US$10449.00
IDP–IV (16e) Kitchen Upgradation, STS Pokhriabong Rs.417,931.00 US$10449.00

 

Non–IDP–IV Projects

School Infrastructure Development Projects

Sr. No.

Project Title

Budget (Rupees)

1.

Re-plastering of Hostel Block, CST Chauntra

Rs.78,400.00

2.

Renovation of Boundary Fencing, STS Gangtok

Rs.174,313.00

3.

Renovation of Boundary Wall, STS Puruwala

Rs.199,360.00

4.

Staff Quarter Renovation, CST Puruwala

Rs.234,080.00

5.

Renovation of School Building, STS Gangtok

Rs.1,109,629.00

6.

Renovation of Staff Quarter, STS Dekyiling

Rs.196,000.00

7.

Staff Room Furnishing, STS Shillong

Rs.58,352.00

 

School Waste Management Projects

Sr. No.

Project Title

Budget (Rupees)

1.

Waste Management, STS Bhuntar

Rs.145,000.00

2.

Waste Management, STS Shillong

Rs.145,000.00

3.

Waste Management, TSTS Gangtok

Rs.145,000.00

4.

Waste Management, STS Pokhriabong

Rs.145,000.00

5.

Waste Management, STS Manali

Rs.145,000.00

 

School Musical Instrument Projects

Sr. No.

Project Title

Budget (Rupees)

1.

Cultural/Musical Instrument for (CST Paonta, STS Dekyiling, STS Gangtok, CST Manali, STS Shillong, CST Bir, STS Pokhriabong, STS Puruwala, Mevon Tsuglag Petoen School, STS Gangkyi)

Rs.594,160.00

 

Procurement of Kitchen Utensils for Schools

Sr. No.

Project Title

Budget (Rupees)

1.

Kitchen Utensil for School Kitchen (CST Paonta, CST Chauntra, TSTS Gangtok, STS Shillong and STS Pokhriabong)

Rs.196,000.00

 

Scholarship Program

Scholarship for Research, Specialized and Professional Education

IntroductionThe Department of Education (DoE) of the Central Tibetan Administration (CTA) of His Holiness the Dalai Lama (CTA) oversees the education and welfare of over 25,000 students in 76 schools in India and Nepal. It also raises funds and runs scholarship programs for higher studies. These higher studies include general university degree, diploma, vocational, professional and research courses.

Domestic ScholarshipAround 1200 Tibetan students complete class XII (Senior Secondary Schools) every year and thereafter opt for higher education in various colleges and universities in India. However, the scholarship sources are limited. The Department of Education is able to provide only around 200 scholarships per year for all types of higher studies. Approximately 450 to 500 applicants turn up for these scholarships.

The DoE Scholarship Committee is the main decision making body of all the scholarship programs undertaken by this department. Every year, the DoE annual scholarship announcement is made in the month of January and February. The scholarship announcement is published widely through official journals, newspapers, bulletin and websites. And it’s also been sent to all the Tibetan settlements and schools spread throughout India, Nepal and Bhutan for complete outreach among the interested applicants.

Overseas ScholarshipWhenever the Department of Education CTA receives scholarship offer from overseas colleges or universities, a formal scholarship announcement is sent to all the concerned Tibetan settlements and schools across India, Nepal & Bhutan and also to the Tibetan media (both print & electronic) for wider publicity upon getting approval from the DoE Scholarship Committee. A deadline is set for the submission of application and a selection test is held at Dharamsala for General Tibetan & English written tests followed by interview.

Until 2010, more than 579 Tibetan candidates had received overseas scholarships for higher studies in abroad such as US, UK, France, Japan, Russia, Germany, Italy, Norway, Denmark, Taiwan, Hungary, Mongolia, Poland, Israel, Thailand, Austria, Netherlands and Republic of Costa Rica.

Overseas Scholarships Awarded (1982 to 2010)

Country

No. of Students

USA

431

Norway

3

Japan

18

Hungary

3

Denmark

11

Israel

3

Mongolia

11

UK

54

Taiwan

12

Poland

6

France

4

Italy

6

Germany

4

Thailand

7

Austria

4

Netherlands

1

Republic of Costa Rica

1

Sponsorship Program

Sponsor a Child and Save a Nation


Sponsoring a Tibetan refugee means helping the poor Tibetan parents enroll their children into Tibetan schools in India and directly help our school administration to provide daily food, tuition fees, school uniforms and most of all text books and stationeries for their basic education.

We assure you that the children who are in the sponsorship programmes are carefully chosen candidates by the settlement officers from the lot of poorest of poor and the most needy member of the society. 
Once in the schools, after a proper individual background study, the sponsorship funds provided by you are allocated and send to the child through various schools. As per rules, each child gets one sponsor and ideally each sponsor would like to commit themselves to assists the selected child unto their high school education.

Our aims & objectives:1.    Provide universal basic education for all2.    Instill & imbibe Tibetan culture & identity3.    Become responsible human based on principle of universal responsibility

Hundreds of Refugee Children Need Your Assistance


In 1959, following the Chinese invasion of Tibet, over 80,000 Tibetans had to flee their homeland along with His Holiness the Dalai Lama into exile mainly in the neighboring countries of India, Nepal and Bhutan. There are over 150,000 Tibetans living in exile today. The continuous suppression and occupation of Tibet has caused a steady flow of Tibetan refugees even today. Many of these people are in need of immediate humanitarian and rehabilitation aids, let alone have the means to provide education for their children, thus the need for this appeal for your help. Our sojourn in exile may be prolonged as a mutual solution is nowhere in sight. Without proper education and skills, the lives in exile are going to be hard and treacherous. The education is only our hope and it is also our end and means to protect our culture and survive to sustain our freedom moments in exile. Your help is therefore essential and need of the hour.

How can you remain connected with the child you sponsor?   

Each sponsor will receive bi-annual academic reports on the progress of the student along with necessary painting, photographic documentations. We can also facilitate, if any sponsor who would like to communicate directly with the child through letters, email etc. We have observed such communications often help develop inter personal relations and academic development also.  Otherwise we are always available to assist you should you need any particular information and have any special enquiries.

Tibetan education infrastructure & costs: 

With over years of hard works and benevolent leadership, we have today over 76 different schools located all over India & Nepal with over 24,000 enrolled students. And, there are 1693 teachers and 654 staff. Despite all difficulties, serious attempts have been made to build schools in every nook and corner of India & Nepal where Tibetans are living in scattered communities for easy access to this basic need and right. The school administration has to collect grants, donations and sponsorship funds over crores of rupees each year to run these schools.

How is the annual cost for a sponsored Child accounted for? 

As per minimum real cost of living within a school premise, we would like to request every sponsor to donate US$ 30 per month per child (One time annual donation of US$ 360) for providing basic amenities. We have systematic processes to appropriate this fund to achieve measurable impacts expected by every stakeholder. All donations are well accounted for and regularly audited as per the given legal provisions and registered societies rules and regulations. We provide instant receipts and copies of audited reports on asking.

Why must basic education of Tibetan refugees in exile depended on grants, aids, donations? 

Unlike any other national governments, Central Tibetan Administration (CTA) does not have tax based revenue for its developmental activities. As such we have been organizing various fund raising activities and formulating projects through our offices and sections for efficient and successful management and administration of various educational institutions. This child sponsorship programme is one of them. This is regarded as one of the most successful amongst programmes, thanks to your sustain supports and commitment.

Training Program

Teacher Training/Professional Development Programme

TEACHER TRAININGOne of the basic factors, which determine teacher quality, is the standard of teacher training institutes. Many of Tibetan teachers those who were teaching above class VI had to acquire minimum qualification of graduate (B.A/B.Sc) plus Bachelor of Education from recognized institutions.

PGT Tibetan workshop, SarnathThe Department of Education, Central Tibetan Administration provides various teachers training programmes to meet the requirement of teachers in Tibetan schools. The training programmes are fully sponsored with funding assistance from various NGOs/Governments.

Montessori Teachers TrainingMontessori system of education is being followed in the Tibetan schools. The Department of Education, CTA in collaboration with the TCV Montessori Teachers Training Centre, Dharamsala (now shifted to Bangalore) had conducted the Montessori teachers training from time to time on need base.

Primary Teachers TrainingWith the switch in the medium of instruction at the junior level from English to Tibetan in the mid-nineties, the need was felt to recruit more teachers competent to teach through Tibetan medium. Trainings are being organised in close collaboration with the College of Higher Tibetan Studies, Sarah.Under the implementation of the Basic Education Policy (BEP), more trainings are being conducted for quality recruitment of teachers in the schools. The candidates must possess the minimum of bachelor’s degree to be eligible to receive the teacher’s training course.

Middle School Teachers TrainingMiddle school teacher’s trainings are being conducted by the DOE in collaboration with Central University of Tibetan Studies (CUTS), Sarnath and College of Higher Tibetan Studies (CHTS), Sarah from time to time. English Teachers Workshop in DelhiDespite the best efforts, the resource of qualified teachers for Tibetan schools in India and Nepal still remains highly insufficient. As an urgent long-term measure towards addressing that problem, the Department of Education has decided to establish a Teachers’ Education Centre at Bhuntar in Kullu District, Himachal Pradesh in 2012 for developing Tibetan teachers. Preparatory works are underway in collaboration with CUTS to provide B.Sc. B.Ed & B.A. B.Ed. 4-year integrated course-a teacher education with strong foundation in Tibetan culture and language.

Music & Dance Teachers TrainingAll Tibetan schools impart instruction in music and dance as part of preservation and promotion of Tibetan culture. Trained teachers in the field are recruited in the schools. The Department of Education conducts music and dance teachers training programmes on the basis on need assessment in the schools. Intensive trainings are provided in collaboration with the Tibetan Institute of Performing Arts (TIPA), Dharamsala.

Spiritual Teachers TrainingBuddhist philosophy and spiritual values are being taught in the schools to inculcate moral and cultural values among the younger generation to become good human beings alongwith academic pursuit. Learned Buddhist monks/nuns are appointed as spiritual teachers in the schools. The Department of Education conducts orientation trainings to them on the functioning of schools and teaching techniques. As of now, all the Tibetan schools from Middle level onward have one such teacher.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMSThe professional development programmes for teachers are required from time to time in order keep abreast with the changing technological development in the field of education. Besides, teachers should get a common platform to share and exchange experiences with teachers from other schools. Keeping this in mind, DOE make plans to organise in-service training programmes/workshop especially in the field of Tibetan culture related subjects and language for various categories of teachers viz. Montessori teachers, primary teachers (PRT), trained graduate teachers (TGT), post graduate teachers (PGT), music & dance teachers and spiritual and cultural teachers.

Announcements
Kalon's Message

The Department of education is one of the most important departments of the Central Tibetan Administration. It is responsible for educating Tibetan refugee children in both traditional and modern forms of education. His Holiness the Dalai Lama’s dream is to nurture Tibetan students who are not only sharp intellectually, but also responsible community members and world citizens.

Over the last fifty years, the Department of Education has done a commendable job of establishing various schools and educating thousands of Tibetan students who have successfully graduated from their schools and gone on to pursue higher education in universities around the world. Many alumni ofTibetan schools administered by the Department or recipients of Department scholarships are now serving the Tibetan community in various capacities—as parliamentarians, civil servants, teachers, doctors, journalists, activists, lawyers and so on.

The challenge now is to further improve the exile education system and provide access to higher education to all Tibetans. Education is a key priority for the current Tibetan administration. One of our goal is to significantly expand the base of Tibetan professionals holding advance degrees in fields such as medicine, science, mathematics, engineering, law, business, etc.

This group of educated professionals have a vital role to play in our struggle to restore freedom in Tibet. We are fortunate that His Holiness the Dalai Lama has kindly given us his blessing in this regard.

Whatever I have achieved today in life is because of the education I received first from a Tibetan school and then higher education in India and in the United States. I am well aware of the challenges and opportunities Tibetans students encounter on the path to receiving quality education and becoming a successful professional. As the Education Kalon, I am committed to bringing about much-needed reforms in our education system and creating an enabling environment where pursuit of learning is encouraged and quality education is available to all Tibetans.

I take this opportunity to pay my deep respect and admiration to His Holiness the Dalai Lama for his vision to educate Tibetan children both in the traditional and modern fields of studies. Without his leadership and guidance, the exile Tibetan education system would not be where it is today. I also thank all the dedicated staff, teachers, and donors of the Department of Education. Your hard work, sacrifice and support have played a key role in the Department’s work and success. Dr. Lobsang SangayKalon for Department of Education

Scholarship Announcements
All the scholarship Announcements of the Department of Education, Central Tibetan Administration are uploaded in the Departmental website. Those interested in applying for the scholarship are requested to visit www.sherig.org