Planning Commission

1: About Planning Commission

 The Planning Commission (PC) was established in 1988 as Planning Council, to improve and upgrade the quality of planning for the development of the Tibetan community. The primary aim of the PC is to institutionalize the planning process within the community.The Planning Council chaired by Kashag, and comprised of secretaries and heads of commissions and special units, has been instrumental in introducing planning processes into CTA and publishing of integrated development plans. IT has played pivotal role in establishment of various services units such as Youth Empowerment Support, Tibetan Computer Resource Centre and so on. On 10 June 2003 the erstwhile Planning Council was changed to Planning Commission. It is comprised of the Kashag (cabinet), Chief Planning Officer, Kashag Secretary and two to three experts (hired when required) as members. The Planning Commission is chaired by the Kalon Tripa with Finance Kalon as its Vice Chairman.The Commission’s regular and background work is undertaken by the Office of the Planning Commission. The Office appraises, recommends for approval by the chairman and evaluates CTA projects. It provides planning and project related technical supports to the Kashag and the Departments.  The Office of the Planning Commission has come out with four Integrated Development Plans, two Tibetan Demographic Surveys (essentially census), a follow-up socio-economic survey, and the first donors conference report. 2: ProgramsIntegrated Development Plans (IDPs) Like any legitimate government, the CTA is committed to serving the Tibetan people. Right from its inception, the CTA has set itself the twin tasks of rehabilitating and development of Tibetans in exile, while endeavoring to peacefully resolve the Tibet issue with China. The education, democracy and self-reliant economy have been the most important programs. Thanks to the philanthropy and support from many governments, organizations and individuals to the non-violent struggle of Tibetans, CTA and the Tibetans under the enlightened leadership of His holiness the Dalai Lama has been able to create a modest success that earned us the title of “most successful refugee community.”    However, the very fact of being a refugee is a sad and humiliating experience. We are still far away from restoring freedom within Tibet. In fact the situation inside Tibet is getting worse. Our struggle is long and arduous. It will be prolonged much beyond our anticipation. Under such a scenario, the burden and responsibility of CTA will increase. CTA will cease to exist when Tibet issue is resolved. Until then, however, CTA envisions a non-violent and truth seeking society that enhances Tibetan people’s ability to preserve and promote their culture and traditions through right livelihood for all. With that vision, CTA pledges to work on the basic principles of truth, nonviolence, and genuine democratic governance, aimed at securing environmental safety, poverty alleviation and long-term sustainability. In pursuance of that vision, CTA has set the following three goals: Goal 1: Making Settlements Viable:The Tibetan refugee settlements were set up primarily to preserve the unique Tibetan culture and traditions by providing a modest self-supporting livelihood based on agriculture and handicrafts. Over the years, the settlements have experienced an unprecedented out migration of able-bodied persons, thus threatening the very survival and the purpose of the settlements. In view of this, making settlements viable has assumed the first developmental priority. This involves helping restructure and revitalize agriculture and rural co-operatives through the institution of democratic local governance. These changes must help in creating a favorable environment which would encourage participation and investment in rural resource base (physical & human) formation that initiate new methods (need-based) of production and consumption patterns based on local produced goods and services. The values of products are determined by labor values and not just by exchange value. Since we believe that the happiness of human beings crops out of contentment, maximizing wants would only lead to discontentment. This cannot be done in geographic isolation. In fact the ultimate success of the programme will depend upon how far the projected outcomes benefit the surrounding villages of rural India.Goal 2: Strengthening Institutions: Effective secular and non-secular institutions that uphold unique Tibetan polity, culture and traditions needs to be strengthen even in exile situations for achieving individual and collective aspirations. Strengthening public institutions along with Tibetan civil society form the next priority in the fourth integrated development of the exile community. Institutions can beboth formal and informal in nature. They essentially uphold the values of Tibetan polity, culture and traditions. Secular and religious institutions are the two main institutions. Education is an essential means and ends of these institutions to build and sustain the Tibetan nation. It promotes and provides essential characters, and helps in developing individual and collective capacities to sustain a way of life while inculcating the Tibetan identity. Truth seeking, non-violence and compassion, occupy the core of Tibetan identity and development pursuits. Over the years, the lack of focus has led to a situation where we are faced with declining effectiveness of public institutions resulting losing public trusts. This situation needs to be overcome.   Goal 3: Integrating Scattered Population: The scattered population lives physically outside of the regular settlements. They do not directly benefit from the Development projects and programmes. They are the most alienated and vulnerable people in terms of the external forces and hazardous elements. They are faced with sets of problems different from the regular settlements. Socio-cultural alienation and discrimination, identity crisis, deadly diseases like HIV/AIDS, drugs/substance abuse and lack of access to Tibetan education are the some of the major problem. The recent Tibetan Demographic Survey showed that the scattered population areas have increased by two fold over the last four decades and the process continues. This needs to be contained with determined efforts and specific programmes.      The Integrated Development Plans are prepared in a combination of policy driven top down and need based bottom up approach in pursuance of these CTA goals. So far four plans have been prepared.

 

Tibetan Demographic Surveys (TDS)Information in form of statistics is required, to take meaningful decision, analyze programmes, formulate projects, and create policies. Although survey and research data are useful, they are not comprehensive in coverage. A full coverage data collection is called Census, and in the exile Tibetan community, Tibetan Demographic Surveys (census in effect) is initiated and undertaken by the Office of the Planning Commission. The first one was undertaken in 1998 and the second one was undertaken in2009. The office also undertook a follow-up socioeconomic survey in 2001 as a post enumeration check. The surveys reports are available for sale at no profit no loss price.

Snapshots data of Tibetan Demographic Survey 1998 & 2009Snapshots data of Tibetan Demographic Survey 1998 & 2009

Variables

TDS 1998*

TDS 2009

Decadal Changes

GENERAL

 

 

 

Population

98,867**

109,015

15,929 (14.6%)

Male

51,059 (55.8%)

60,599 (55.5%)

9,540 (0.3%)

Female

40,443 (44.1%)

48,416 (44.4%)

7,973 (0.3%)

Sex ratio (males/1000 females)

126

125

-1

Age-dependency ratio

53%

41%

-12%

AGE GROUP

 

 

 

Age-group

 

 

 

0 – 14

23,122

20,302

-2,820

15 – 64

59,648

75,031

15,383

65 & above

8,584

10,700

2,116

Age not clear/stated

148

2,982

2,834

HEALTH INDICATORS

 

 

 

Crude Birth Rate (CBR)

7.83

8.99

1

Crude Death Rate (CDR)

8.78

9.7

1

Infant Mortality Rate (IMR)

38.9

15.44

-59%

Total Fertility Rate (TFR)

1.22

1.18

-0.04

Total Marital Fertility Rate (TMFR)

2.75

3.6

0.85

LITERACY

 

 

 

General literacy rate (%)

61.6%

71.4%

10%

Effective literacy rate (%)

74.5%

82.4%

7.9%

WORKFORCE

 

 

 

Workforce population (15 – 64 years)

 

 

 

Main workers (%)

20,928 (35%)

27,540 (39%)

6,612 (4%)

Marginal workers (%)

604 (1%)

5,525 (8%)

4,921 (7%)

Non-workers (%)

38,116 (64%)

36,755 (53%)

1,361 (-11%)

Non-workers seeking jobs

4,193 (11%)

6,104 (17%)

1,911 (6%)

Notes:* TDS ’98 was conducted only for Tibetans in India and Nepal whereas TDS ’09 includes Bhutan (pop: 1,298)** Household population. Population as per individual questionnaire was: 91,502  Notes:* TDS ’98 was conducted only for Tibetans in India and Nepal whereas TDS ’09 includes Bhutan (pop: 1,298)** Household population. Population as per individual questionnaire was: 91,502 

Regular workThis involves the normal administrative as well as more technical, project feasibility appraisal, formulation and recommendations keeping in view of the guiding principles, policies and vision. That apart, the Office also undertakes project evaluations and project management trainings for the project officers, as and when needs are felt or requested upon by the implementation Departments. It provides technical project and plan related inputs and status updates to the Kashag.Regular work

This involves the normal administrative as well as more technical, project feasibility appraisal, formulation and recommendations keeping in view of the guiding principles, policies and vision. That apart, the Office also undertakes project evaluations and project management trainings for the project officers, as and when needs are felt or requested upon by the implementation Departments. It provides technical project and plan related inputs and status updates to the Kashag.