Published By Tenzin Saldon

His Holiness the Dalai Lama at Jokhang temple in Leh Ladakh, 4 July 2018. Photo/Jayang Tsering/DIIR

Leh Ladakh: Kicking off his day 2 engagements in Ladakh, His Holiness the Dalai Lama addressed a group of Buddhist scholars and officials during a pilgrimage to Jokhang temple in Leh Ladakh Wednesday morning.

Delving on the revival of ancient Indian psychology in modern India, His Holiness said he feels strongly about the subject and its potential benefit for the world.

“The future of humanity depends on the adoption of a positive mental attitude by the current generation. This is why a holistic education is so important. Modern education is very sound, but it seems to be based on a universal acceptance of the importance of developing the brain. Not enough attention is given to the development of the person as a whole, and to encouraging a clear sense of values and a warm heart.

He said Tibetan Buddhist scholars in Sera, Drepung, Gaden Monastery and others who have been studying the Nalanda texts for over twenty years can assist the modern teachers in understanding this ancient knowledge and incorporate them in the modern education system.

“This country, India has the opportunity to develop a more integrated education system by incorporating the modern and ancient knowledge,” he said. “Practices such as Shamata and Vipassana involve analytical meditation and single-minded focus to analyse the nature of reality. Similarly, there is a huge wealth of knowledge on tackling emotions and deeper understanding of the mind”.

He further spoke about India’s 1,000-year-old tradition of secularism, which he said is very relevant to today’s world.

“India is the only country where the centuries’ old idea of ahimsa, non-violence, is part of the culture and way of life. This contributes to the remarkable sense of religious harmony that prevails in the only country in which all the world’s religions live together side by side in respect and friendship.

“Though there were differences in philosophical thought, it was never used for propagating violence. Hindu, Jain and Buddhist philosophies are home-grown, and Zoroastrian, Judaism and Christianity came from outside. For over 3 to 4000 years, all these faiths have lived together in harmony. That is the greatness of India.

Speaking of faith, His Holiness said he accords equal respect for all religion. “However, in terms of philosophy, I think Buddhist philosophy is very unique and scientific. He argued that the Tibetan Buddhist philosophy speaks of scientific phenomena such as interdependence, which has aroused great interest in modern scientists.

Tsewang Thinles, President of the Ladakh Buddhist Association saluted His Holiness and other eminent Lamas. He reported that, taking His Holiness’s guidance to heart, the Ladakh Buddhist Association has decided to transform the Jokhang into a centre of learning. They are providing opportunities for people to improve their command of literary Tibetan and study Buddhist teachings with the aim of becoming 21st century Buddhists—people whose faith is based on a sound understanding.

Gaden Trisur Rizong Rinpoche, Thigtse Rinpoche, MP Thubten Tsewang and Leh MLA Rigzin Jora were present at the ceremony. President of Ladakh Buddhist Association, Tsewang Thinley moderated the event.

His Holiness the Dalai Lama at Jokang temple in Leh Ladakh, 4 July 2018. Photo/Jayang Tsering/DIIR

His Holiness the Dalai Lama comforting a young woman as he arrives at Jokhang temple in Leh Ladakh, 4 July 2018. Photo/Jayang Tsering/DIIR

His Holiness the Dalai Lama at Jokhang temple, Leh Ladakh, 4 July 2018. Photo/Jayang Tsering/DIIR

Members of Ladakh community at entering the Jokhang temple to listen to His Holiness the Dalai Lama, 4 July 2018. Photo/Jayang Tsering/DIIR

Members of Ladakh community accords a traditional welcome to His Holiness the Dalai Lama as he arrives at Jokhang temple, 4 July 2018. Photo/Jayang Tsering/DIIR

 

 

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