Statement of German Government’s Commissioner for Human Rights Policy on Self-Immolations in Tibet


March 13, 2012 5:42 pm

Berlin, 12 February 2012

German government’s commissioner for human rights policy Markus Löning (FDP [Liberal Party]), called on China to rethink its Tibet policy after the recent self-immolations of three monks: “Further repressions won’t lessen the desperation”, said Löning to representatives of Tibet Initiative Deutschland (TID) on Thursday. “The Chinese government should frame its policy bring to an end to the existing tensions in the Tibetan areas.” The protection of the Tibetan culture including the religious traditions is indispensable for an understanding and an easing of tension.
 
There have been in total 15 self-immolations in Tibet since March 2011. “They are an expression of desperation and the continuing deep resentment from parts of the Tibetan population in China”, said Löning. The federal government has repeatedly asked the Chinese government to bring in transparency to the incidents regarding the Kirti monastery as well as to Tibet at large and to provide unhindered access for international medias, politicians and diplomats.
 
TID presented over 19’245 signatures calling for the release of Tibetan political prisoners were handed over to the federal commissioner for human rights policy Markus Löning. “Besides nuns and monks, more and more journalists, writers and actors of the civil society are being targeted by the security authorities”, said TID chairman Wolfgang Grader. “The repressions in the monasteries as well as the prosecution of intellectuals show that the aim of the Chinese leadership to systematically destroy Tibetan identity”. Currently, there are over 800 political prisoners in Tibet.
 
The Tibet Initiative Deutschland (TID) has espoused the right of self determination of the Tibetan people and the adherence of human rights in occupied Tibet, since their foundation in 1989. They give Tibet a strong voice with 60 regional groups and nearly 2000 members throughout Germany. TID is predominantly funded by subscriptions and donations of individuals.